Monday, October 3, 2011

Steamboats For The Business Executive



Over the years, up to recent times, I have had the opportunity to introduce my models to the executive sector of businesses both in New York and New England. Today my models are displayed in companies and corporations that have great views of our rivers and waterways here in the Northeast.

                           Fall River Line nightboat COMMONWEALTH  c.1925,  Scale 1:182

What better way to celebrate our maritime heritage than with a model of those steamboats that once travelled our industrialized and busy rivers. It's not enough to have a Bard or Jacobsen painting gracing the wall -but accent those heirlooms with a beautiful model of the actual vessel.

This can be done through careful research and drafting of actual plans.

Certainly, we can't bring back the steamboat era of yesterday such as the Fall River Line, the Hudson River Day Line, the Stonington Line, Eastern Steamship Line out of Boston and others. But we can honor this era of Americana with a museum-quality signature model of a steamboat that once travelled on these waters.





The great Northeast was embellished with graceful yet handsome boats, so rare and unique in structural appearance that, in miniature, these would truly compliment any Boardroom, library or office setting. In essence, a one-of-a-kind.

                                   
                                  NANTUCKET c.1895 -Detail, Wood Model, Scale 1/8" = 1'

These images reflect such timeless vessels and are memorable to those (and their ancestors) who once rode and/or operated them. MARY POWELL, JACOB H. TREMPER and WASHINGTON IRVING of Hudson River fame. COMMONWEALTH, PLYMOUTH and PRISCILLA of Fall River. NOBSKA, NAUSHAN and NANTUCKET of New England's island steamers. These and more can be realized for the executive who celebrates the maritime.

These are great investments and the open door to America's past.

                            
                                 Hudson River Steamboat M. MARTIN c.1880 -Wood Scale Model

We have the paintings...

Isn't time we have the models? Let's share the possibilities and the history.

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